New Episode Incoming

Happy Labor Day! Due to the holiday our Water Cooler discussion of The Walking Dead’s season two finale will be released tomorrow. 

Enjoy the long weekend!

The Ubi Workshop store sent out an e-mail announcing this new addition to its catalogue: an art print featuring on of our favorite characters: Aveline de Grandpre from Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation and Assassin’s Creed: Liberation HD.  It’s limited to 300 copies and is currently available for pre-order for $69.99. 
Meanwhile, I’m still waiting for that action figure. - Stacey

The Ubi Workshop store sent out an e-mail announcing this new addition to its catalogue: an art print featuring on of our favorite characters: Aveline de Grandpre from Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation and Assassin’s Creed: Liberation HD.  It’s limited to 300 copies and is currently available for pre-order for $69.99. 

Meanwhile, I’m still waiting for that action figure. - Stacey

There are indeed legitimate concerns to have about games journalism. By far… BY FAR… the biggest source of these is the issue of funding. If you want good quality games journalism, someone has to be willing to pay games journalists grown-up salaries. More often than not, especially online, the money comes from advertising revenue paid for by the same big publishers that they are supposed to be writing about. This is a conflict of interest. It’s been so long since I read IGN that I genuinely forget they exist sometimes. As businesses these organisations have certain responsibilities to their employees (and, to a greater extent, shareholders) and it’s inevitable that they’ll conservatively support the people who pay them. Perhaps I’m oversimplifying things? AH WELL!


The fact that so much focus has been on the issue of two people having sex, instead of the ongoing multi-million dollar financial mechanisms that compromise the integrity of most professional games websites, speaks volumes. As the ‘debate’ shifted from simply harassing Zoe to crusading over JOURNALISTIC ETHICS, other connections between writers and developers who are friends, or who have lived together, were dug up by armchair detectives combing through old blog posts and twitter streams. And as this turd of a conspiracy theory has curled its way out onto the pig balls of public debate, it’s also worth noting that the journalists and developers being accused of collusion are all being linked together because of their association with ‘social justice’- nobody gives a fuck about Geoff Keighley’s personal life, or who Reggie Fils-Aime is playing golf with, but any tweet that provides trolls with another half-arsed excuse to try and get Patricia Hernandez fired has traction.

IT IS OBVIOUS THAT THE ISSUE OF ‘JOURNALISTIC ETHICS’ IS BEING USED TO CAST A VENEER OF LEGITIMACY OVER WHAT IS, AT ITS HEART, A CAMPAIGN TO ATTACK ‘OUTSPOKEN’ GAME DEVELOPERS AND JOURNALISTS.

gameological
gameological:


"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

—For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power

gameological:

"In the 2000 game, the biggest threats are oppression and harassment from authority figures. In the 2008 game, bullying and toxicity threaten to destroy the culture from within. The kids of World are placed in a direct competition that can only have one winner, forcing them to view each other as threats. They also have to contend with the Reapers, older teenage enforcers who target players for sport. In World’s vision of Shibuya, kids their own age are a threat, and the older kids are a source of fear and persecution instead of guidance and support.”

For Our Consideration: Two ultra-hip Japanese games of the 2000s showcased youth culture’s uplifting power