The difficulty in applying Clover’s “Final Girl” to gaming is that it usually ignores the transferral of the phallic weapon from the male aggressor to the female lead. A girl-protagonist can be “final” in the sense that she survives all of her companions, but either her femininity is re-enforced in a sense of helplessness (being forced to hide like in Clock Tower), or she is masculinized by building her own arsenal independent of her aggressors (think Jill in Resident Evil 3).  This is something the article doesn’t address, but it does illustrate how ingenuity and survivalism are portrayed when the the lead is a woman—final or ortherwise. - Stacey

sophiafosterdimino

sophiafosterdimino:

I made these three tiny PS1-themed zines to give away during GX2 in mid-July. I sold them online shortly after for $1 a 3-pack, and then sold out of them completely at San Francisco Zine Fest last weekend, so now I’m putting them online, here you go.

These are single-sheet zines, quick and painless, drawn in like two days, and Rookie has a good single-sheet zine tutorial if you want to give it a shot.

Thanks everyone who said kind words about them at GX2, thanks everyone who bought a copy, thanks Brian Crecente for writing about them on Polygon, thanks thanks thanks.

Did you know GX is returning next year? The GX3 kickstarter has a little over a week left to go, support them!

Finally, this is my 100th post on this tumblr. Thank you for following me.

( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

alpha-beta-gamer

alpha-beta-gamer:

Uncanny Valley is a creepy nightmarish pixel art survival horror game with action and puzzle elements that features intense moments of dread and real consequences for your actions.

You play as a night shift security guard a strange research facility, who has problems with insomnia, often lapsing into a dream-like states while on the job, making the player constantly question what’s real.  As you explore the research facility, you’ll soon discover all is not well.  You’ll have to run, hide, use your wits and solve puzzles to live through this well crafted nightmare.

The consequence system of Uncanny Valley is a particular highlight, which draws some comparisons to Heavy Rain.  You can die at some points but they’re few and far between, for the most part whenever you fail at something, the game will carry on, but with real consequences for your character.  For example, if you fail to escape your attackers, your character will move slower for the rest of the game, making things that much harder. 

The Alpha Demo packs more suspense, dread and ‘oh shit!’ moments into it’s 10 minute playtime that most games horror games manage in 8 hours.  With it’s tense atmosphere, beautiful pixel art, intriguing story and real consequences for your actions, Uncanny Valley is shaping up to be uncannily good.

Download the Free Alpha Demo & Check out the IndieGoGo Campaign

gamingfeminism

overthinkingvideogames:

On Mountain.